Sandon JMI School

Learning, Resilience, Independence

English

Reading

Intent  

At Sandon, we encourage our children to become enthusiastic and motivated readers who take enjoyment when reading for pleasure. We aim for our children to have the confidence to read a wide variety of genres and text types when choosing their books independently. Both in-class and during assemblies, we read a wide variety of genres that are thought provoking and expose the children to the wider world and experiences they would not perhaps encounter in our rural area.  

 

Implementation

Our Infant children are taught early reading through daily phonics sessions. In Reception, children start reading captions and wordless stories before moving onto books that closely match their phonic abilities – these books are not on the Accelerated Reader Scheme. Children in Year One continue to read phonetically decodable books and this is due to a change in the Ofsted guidance on early reading. Following completion of the phonetically decodable books, children in Year Two will start to read books on the Accelerated Reader Scheme. 

Our Junior children are taught reading through a variety of different methods with some including: small group reading sessions, whole class texts in English lessons and comprehension materials. Children take home books within their Accelerated Reader reading range and are encouraged to spend time reading aloud at home with their parents as well as independent reading. Here is a link to our Accelerated reader page.

At Sandon, we ensure that our whole class teaching and small group learning activities target the development of both decoding and language comprehension.

 

 

Our Infant children are taught early reading through daily phonics sessions. In Reception, children start reading captions and wordless stories before moving onto books that closely match their phonic abilities – these books are not on the Accelerated Reader Scheme. Children in Year One continue to read phonetically decodable books and this is due to a change in the Ofsted guidance on early reading. Following completion of the phonetically decodable books, children in Year Two will start to read books on the Accelerated Reader Scheme.

Our Junior children are taught reading through a variety of different methods with some including: small group reading sessions, whole class texts in English lessons and comprehension materials. Children take home books within their Accelerated Reader reading range and are encouraged to spend time reading aloud at home with their parents as well as independent reading.

Reading forms the main part of a child’s weekly homework. Below shows the expected amount of time children should read for each day:

 

 

 

 

Both in-class and during assemblies, we encourage an early love of reading by sharing a wide range of genres with children: stories are always used as a main focal point during our assemblies; they have wide links to a variety of curriculum areas.

Reading for pleasure is encouraged and children regularly listen to texts, beyond their current stage of independent reading comprehension, which are read aloud by an adult. At Sandon, we feel this is hugely beneficial to our learners as it models reading with fluency, the use of expressions and intonation – all skills that we hope to see the children use in their own reading. When adults read aloud, children are given the opportunity to discuss their understanding through questions from adults which, in turn, supports them to develop their comprehension skills.

At Sandon school the children use Accelerated Reader. This helps the children to find books that are an appropriate level for their reading ability and allows them to stretch and challenge themselves. You can find more information on Accelerated Reader here 

Phonics

Intent

At Sandon JMI School we want to equip all children with the skills and knowledge required to become confident readers. We recognise the importance of reading and writing, both across the curriculum and also in everyday life and we want our pupils to succeed and to develop a lifelong love of reading. In order to ensure our children get off to the best possible start, we use 'Supersonic Phonic Friends' to deliver phonics.  This programme is a fully systematic, synthetic phonic approach ranging from the simple to the complex spellings of the alphabetic code. Supported by their Supersonic Phonic friends, this approach will ensure children develop confidence and apply each skill to their own reading and writing. We want every child to be successful and fluent readers at the end of Key Stage One. We believe that this is achievable through a combination of high quality, daily, discrete synthetic phonics teaching combined with regular, daily opportunities for developing reading skills. The teaching of phonics is a key strategy that is used to help our children to read and spell. We believe that phonics provides the foundations of learning to make the development into fluent reading and writing easier. Phonics is the process that is used to help children break down words into sounds, as well as building letter and word recognition. This can then enable children to use unknown words in the future. Children learn to segment words to support their spelling ability and blend sounds to read the words.

 

Implementation
 
Children in Reception and Year 1 take part in daily phonics sessions throughout the year. Phonics is taught consistently across school. The lessons are always taught at a fast pace to ensure children are highly engaged for the sessions. All teachers use the same resources, flashcards and teaching strategies and give children the chance to revisit/review previous sounds and/or tricky/ high frequency words previously taught, learn a new sound or concept where applicable, practice the new learning to reading or writing words/ sentences, apply the new learning to read and/or write (dictation of words and sentences) and practice basic sight words – ‘tricky’ words and high frequency words. Multi-sensory activities are used when children are first learning sounds encompassing visual, auditory and kinaesthetic activities. Lessons are fast paced and engaging to ensure that all children are actively involved in phonics lessons. Knowledge is constantly reviewed and reinforced in each phonic lesson, building upon previous learning. Pupils are given opportunities to apply what they have learnt in guided reading or when they read aloud to an adult. Children are continually assessed and those who are falling behind are identified early and catch up is put in place. Children in Reception are expected to acquire knowledge of Supersonic Phonic Friends The Basics- “Phase 2” (s a t p I n m d g o c k ck e u r h b f ff l ll ss), “Phase 3” (j v w x y z zz qu ch sh th ng ai ee oa igh oo o oar or) and “Phase 3 plus” (ur ow oi er ure ear air). They may also begin Phase 4- “adjacent consonants” (CVCC- tent, camp; CCVC- stop, flag; CVCC- roast, paint; CCVC- float, brain; CCVCC- splash and CCCVCC- sprint). Children in Year 1 will re-cap previous Phase 3 learning to ensure secure knowledge and move onto new Phase 4- “adjacent consonants” and Phase 5- “the higher level of phonics” covering multiple spellings (ai/ay, igh/ie, oa/oe, ee/ea, oo/ue) (ai/ay/a_e, igh/ie/i_e, oa/oe/o_e, ee/ea/e_e, oo/ue/u_e) (oi/oy, ur/ir, ow/ou, or/aw, w/wh) (air/are, n/kn, r/wr, f/ff/ph, or/aw/au) (n/kn/gn, or/aw/au/ore, ee/ea/e_e/ey, ee/ea/e_e/ey/y, oo/ue/u_e/ew) and alternative pronounciations (i- tin/wild, o-hot/cold, c-cat/city, g- gate/gent, u-hug/unit, ow- clown/snow, ie- pie/chief, ea- sea/head, er- farmer/her, e- bed/he, a- hat/acorn, y- yes/gym, ch- chin/chef, ou- out/could, ey- money/they, a- hat/acorn/was, y- yes/gym/very/by, ch- chin/chef/school, ou- out/could/mould/you). Children’s decodable reading books are carefully matched to their phonic knowledge. We use the Big Cat reading scheme which is organised by phonics phases so that books are fully decodable. We hold a phonics information evening at the beginning of each academic year to help parents support their child. Teachers are confident using the Herts phonics tracker, which is our main online assessment tool. This is used regularly to assess children’s knowledge, so teachers can plug the gaps. Children read with adults at least twice each week, during guided reading and 1:1 reading sessions. Children who are working below the expected standard and Reception/KS1 Pupil Premium children have additional reading sessions 1:1 with an adult. 

 

Impact

The impact of consistent, systematic, high quality teaching of the “Supersonic Phonic friends” scheme is that children will develop a love of reading and writing and be confident, fluent readers by the end of Key Stage 1. The Hertfordshire phonics tracker is used to monitor progress and to identify any child needing additional support as soon as they need it. Appropriate interventions are put in place for children who are not making expected progress. Assessment for learning is used daily within class to identify children needing additional support. Children in Year 1 sit the Phonics Screening Check. Any child not passing the check re-sits it in Year 2.

 

Writing

Intent 

At Sandon, we ensure that children are given the opportunity to write from experience as well as for a range of purposes and for pleasure. We also use drama and group work to support the children’s progression of writing.  

For our writing curriculum, we use schemes from CLPE which link to a wide range or book genres to help promote different writing outcomes. From this, teachers model expected writing outcomes expected of the children so they are aware of ‘what a good one looks like’ also known as a WAGOLL. In the older year groups, children are encouraged to edit their finished pieces and improve their punctuation choices and their vocabulary choices; to do this, children are given opportunities to secure their skills in using a dictionary/thesaurus.  

Implementation  

Children are given the opportunity to write for a range of purposes and we ensure they understand the audience for whom they are writing for. Without this knowledge or understanding, the writing does not have a purpose and they cannot relate it to future scenarios in life when they would use the specific genre. 

Modelled writing is key for the children so they understand what to aim for with their own writing. To do this, they are shown WAGOLLs and/or by composing pieces as a whole class which the children can then use to support their own independent writing. Children are supported through the form of scaffolding wherever appropriate.  

Staff regularly attend moderation meetings with local staff who teach the same year groups in order to assess and moderate the writing their children produce. These sessions are also hugely beneficial to our staff as not only do they help us to moderate our writing but they also provide opportunities to share new teaching ideas to help develop the way we deliver our own lessons.  

 

 

Handwriting 

From reception, children begin to practice their handwriting through a variety of methods in order for them to continue to improve their fine motor skills. Children are encouraged in reception to pick up a pen at any given opportunity with a strong focus on letter formation.  

As children progress through the years, we support their handwriting by using the Penpals handwriting scheme. Children are taught handwriting through good modelling from the scheme and also the adult in the classroom. As children move through the years, we expect joined handwriting in order for them to be closer to achieving their age related expectations set out by the government for writing. By the end of Year Four, all children are encouraged to use a pen for their written work.  

More information on how to support your child with their handwriting can be found on the ‘Home Learning’ section.  

Spelling

This year we are about to embark on a new spelling journey with our school! Recently, we have purchased a school subscription to Spelling Shed which we will use weekly in class to help improve children’s spelling ability. Spelling Shed will be used throughout the school.  

 

The expectations of spellings set out in the National Curriculum can be found here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/239784/English_Appendix_1_-_Spelling.pdf